What’s wrong with ‘Star Wars’ (and How to Fix It)

Once again, I found myself writing a lengthy response to a post on Facebook, and just before I hit send, I thought “gee, this would be better as a post over at the Junk Shop.” So here we are. This time it’s the Star Wars Saga. The first response posted to that thread was the suggestion that “maybe, just maybe, Star Wars was a really cool idea that got taken way too far.” My reaction to that, and the reason we’ve assembled here today, was that some parts were taken too far, while others were simultaneously not taken far enough.

Shazam! and Why Marvel is Beating DC

I finally got around to watching Shazam! this week. Despite having been a fan of Captain Marvel since his revival in 1973, and despite liking Zachary Levi in most of the things I’ve seen him in, I wasn’t really eager to see the film version. This is mostly because DC has had no clue how to handle the character for decades. My worst fears about the film were realized.

Gone in 13 Episodes (or Less!)

It’s been my gift (and curse) that I seem to remember hundreds of terrible TV shows that only aired for half a season and dropped into the abyss half a century ago. I can’t tell you what my bride asked me to pick up after work tonight, but I sure as hell can tell you who starred in ‘A Year at the Top’ 42 years ago, because that’s how the blob of electric jello in my skull works. If I have to know this crap, so do you.

It’s a Musical!

If I were capable of feeling shame, this might be my guilty pleasure, but there’s no guilt involved. I like musicals. It’s just a damn shame that I can’t sing or dance, because I’d love to be in musical theater. I often listen to musicals at work, sometimes old classics like Camelot or Chicago, sometimes more obscure works like Threepenny Opera, or recent shows like Something Rotten, and every so often I go looking for stuff I didn’t know existed. Some of it is on the odd side.

The Tomorrowland Promise

Somehow, we were all convinced to abandon the idea of Utopia, to give up on the notion that the future would be better than today. The reason Disneyland’s Tomorrowland was allowed to become quaint and kitsch and eventually retro-cool is that it couldn’t be updated, because we’ve had no vision for the future since the mid-1970s. Or at least not for a future that’s nicer than our present.