The Tomorrowland Promise

Somehow, we were all convinced to abandon the idea of Utopia, to give up on the notion that the future would be better than today. The reason Disneyland’s Tomorrowland was allowed to become quaint and kitsch and eventually retro-cool is that it couldn’t be updated, because we’ve had no vision for the future since the mid-1970s. Or at least not for a future that’s nicer than our present.

More Missing the Point

Recently “Le Messor” had a post here about “Things Geeks Aren’t Supposed to Think,” which included comments on Watchmen; in the comments section, somebody remarked, “I think people really took the wrong lesson from Watchmen.” That got my brain going in a bit of a different direction from what they intended, and the comment I began to draft in response quickly revealed that it wanted to be a post. So here we are. Following in the wake of Greg Hatcher’s dissection of points missed in media, I find myself adding to his list.

Atomic Roundtable: Stuff We Don’t Get

Together, we at the Junk Shop have a great deal of knowledge about a great many things in the SF/fantasy genre … but there are some odd gaps in our nerd cred. Here we confess to completely missing out on classic shows or movies or whatever that are givens for most people in fan culture. Whether it’s lack of time or lack of access or just plan lack of interest, these are the normally-beloved things we don’t get.

Who Are You Calling a Boomer?

There’s been this trend of late, blaming this generation or that for all the world’s problems — “Boomers destroyed the economy!””Millennials are killing [everything]!” “Gen Xers all want participation trophies!” — and that’s not what this post is about. What it is about is recognizing and appreciating the influences and factors that contribute to some of the trends and attitudes associated with certain generations, and pointing out why some of those generational groupings may be too broad and/or inaccurate.

On the Way to ETEWAF

After reading Hatcher’s “Non-Existent Gift Guide” I got to thinking about all the movies and stuff I’ve searched in vain for over the years, thinking I’d add to his list with a list of my own. Then I thought I should check one more time just to be sure on a few items. Turns out Patton Oswalt was right. He called it ETEWAF: Everything That Ever Was–Available Forever. And it seems like almost everything is available now.